Magnets in the Automotive Industry

Magnets in the automotive industry

Magnets magnet magnets! They are here, there and everywhere and we don’t even realise it. From the device you are reading this on to the hidden catches on your gate, magnets are an extremely versatile product with endless possibilities and are often an unsung hero.

With the British Grand Prix this weekend, support will be high for Lewis Hamilton and Jolyon Palmer! To get into the mood of cars, racing and all things Motorsport, we decided to take a look into how magnets are being used within the automotive industry! We’ll be exploring the use of magnets from the production line all the way to the seatbelt detection! Take a read and see how many you already knew about…

ABS Braking Systems

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Anti Lock Braking Systems are used to help drivers stop the vehicle quicker and to allow them to steer when the vehicle is stopping, helping to prevent accidents. Magnets are used in these systems to keep them attached and wired up to the car itself, ensuring that they are always fixed to the vehicle.

 

Seatbelt Use Detection

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There have been developments in detecting whether or not the passengers and driver in the car are using their seatbelts. These systems use reed switches that change the flow of electricity depending on the presence of a magnet and the type of reed switch.

Door Positioning

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You may have noticed that slightly more modern cars have alert systems for when the car sets off without a door being properly closed or closed at all, and this is controlled by magnets. Using a similar system to that used for seatbelt detection, the doors operate on a Reed Switch system where the flow of electricity to the alarm depends on whether the magnet inside the door is in contact with the Reed Switch located in the car or not.

Car Roof or “Taxi” Magnets
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One widely recognised example of magnets used in the automotive industry is on Car Roof magnets, otherwise known as “Taxi Magnets” because of their widespread usage of holding Taxi signs to the roof of a car. The magnets used in this instance are called clamping magnets, and are used to attach a sign to the roof of the car without the risk of scratching paintwork or the sign sliding off of the car.

Gripping of Car Parts in Production Line

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Magnets can also be used all the way from the production line where a vehicle is made rather than just being included in the end product. They can be used to lift large metal vehicle components and transport them across a factory or similar environment; These parts can also be tracked across a factory floor just by the use of magnets to locate which section the parts are at on the production line.

Tracking Systems

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Neodymium magnets are also sometimes used in order to hold the tracking systems installed to a vehicle in place. The magnets used have a very large pull strength in order to ensure that the tracking system itself does not come free at any point when the vehicle is being used, for example a Tracking system weighing 5kg may be held in place by a magnet with a pull strength of 90kg.

 

So there we have it. The next time you are getting into your car, spare a thought for the magnetic technology that has gone into your vehicle. Not all manufacturers use magnets in the same way, but they are very much a key component in the motor industry and we are delighted to supply various car manufacturers with the magnets they require.

Thanks for reading! It’s now time to sit back, relax and watch the British Grand Prix!

If you have any questions or queries regarding magnets in the automotive industry, drop us an email on sales@first4magnets.com or give us a call on 0845 519 4701 and our team will be happy to help!

In the meantime, lets get social…

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